December 3, 2018

CATA Alliance Launches Cybersecurity 4.0 Study in Manufacturing and Critical Infrastructure

CATA Alliance Launches Cybersecurity 4.0 Study in Manufacturing and Critical Infrastructure

Media Contacts: Huguette Guilhaumon, Sciencetech /Alliance CATA, huguette@sciencetech.com – (514) 656-3254

Montreal, December 03, 2018 — Incidents of cybercrime and the negative impacts felt in the financial and retail sectors are well known and well documented, as they result in hundreds of millions in financial losses and compromised consumer data. Now, however, focus is shifting to the vulnerability of manufacturing and critical infrastructure, attacks on which could severely impact human life.

To measure the impact of this new phenomenon – Industry 4.0 and physical cybercrime – the Canadian Advanced Technology Alliance (CATA) has launched a major Cybersecurity 4.0 study. This threat has implications for cybersecurity, as Richard Wunderlich, Director of Smart Grid Initiatives at Siemens Canada, points out: “The need to protect critical infrastructure has given rise to new priorities. It’s no longer just about protecting data, network integrity, or privacy, but about the availability of the infrastructure itself”.

Today’s automated plant environment is more agile and more efficient than ever before, but it is also more vulnerable than ever before, due to physical cybercrime. More than 70% of manufacturing companies in Canada are automated and a growing number of these companies are interconnecting their automated equipment with their information systems to extract big data and control production in real time.

Critical infrastructure is in a similar position. As critical systems are being connected to the Internet, small groups of hackers with political, militaristic, or economic goals, have seized the opportunities to pose a serious threat to national critical infrastructure. No longer content to attack just the information systems, they are now targeting industrial and electrical equipment and infrastructure. Cybercrime is changing in nature to become physical.

Mr. Jean-Guy Rens, vice president of the CATA Alliance and project manager explains that critical infrastructure will receive special attention: “Large public service companies have been the first targets of physical cybercrime. As such, they play a pioneering role in the development of security measures. The goal of our initiative is to provide manufacturing SMEs with the experience they have gained in infrastructure.”

Mr. Tyson Johnson, Chief Operating Officer of CyberNB explains, “Critical Infrastructure, as the name implies, is Canada’s critical front line in the event of a physical or virtual attack. For organizations mandated to protect critical Infrastructure, security is at the very heart of the operational mandate. With critical Infrastructure, it is the daily operation of society that is at stake. Just consider the consequences of an extended power loss for a given population.”

This initiative was developed through the cooperation of three partners: Ministry of Economy and Innovation of Quebec, Siemens Canada and CyberNB.

The CATA Alliance study is based on three sources: a survey of companies that have already automated their production; a workshop with industry representatives; and customized interviews of leaders in cybersecurity from the public sector, private enterprise, industry, community and university. The results of this study will be made public in mid-2019.

Ministère de l’Économie et de l’Innovation

The Ministry’s mission is to support business growth, entrepreneurship, science, innovation, export trade and investment. The Ministry is coordinating the elaboration and the implementation of the digital strategy. It also advises the Government with a view to favouring economic development in every region of Québec, in a perspective of:

  • job creation;
  • economic prosperity;
  • sustainable development.

Further information is available at https://www.economie.gouv.qc.ca/ministere/english/

Siemens Canada

Since 1912 Siemens Canada has stood for engineering excellence, innovation, quality and reliability. Siemens technology in the fields of electrification, automation and digitalization helps make real what matters to Canadians. From the Atlantic to the Pacific, Siemens Canada employees deliver solutions for sustainable energy, intelligent infrastructure, healthcare, and the future of manufacturing. One of the world’s largest producers of energy-efficient, resource-saving technologies, Siemens is a leading supplier of efficient power generation and power transmission solutions and a pioneer in infrastructure solutions as well as automation, drive and software solutions for industry. The company is also a foremost provider of medical imaging equipment and a leader in laboratory diagnostics and clinical IT. Sales for Siemens Canada in fiscal 2017 (ended September 30), were $2.5 billion CAD. The company has approximately 4,300 employees and 52 locations across Canada. Further information is available at www.siemens.ca.

CyberNB

CyberNB is a special operating agency of Opportunities NB (ONBCanada.ca) that was created in 2016. CyberNB is the only government mandated agency to focus on growing its cybersecurity ecosystem. It works with business, academia and government to:

  • facilitate growth and increase its talent pipeline through its Workforce Strategy,
  • fostering innovation and creating the environment for secure critical infrastructure via its Innovation and Infrastructure Strategy; and
  • securing business growth and customer trust through members of its ecosystem who offer cyber readiness, business process and common criteria certifications as part of its Trust & Compliance Strategy.

Further information is available at https://cybernb.ca/en/.

CATAAlliance

Founded in 1978, the Canadian Advanced Technology Alliance (CATA) is the leading trade association for high-tech industries in Canada and Quebec. Its mission is to support companies in the areas of innovation, research tax credits and financing. CATA is also an innovation advocacy group that uses digital means to educate governments and the private sector. Further information is available at www.cata.ca.

Quotes

“The need to protect critical infrastructure has given rise to new priorities. It’s no longer just about protecting data, network integrity, or privacy, but about the availability of the infrastructure itself”.

Richard Wunderlich, Director of Smart Grid Initiatives, Siemens Canada

“Critical Infrastructure, as the name implies, is Canada’s critical front line in the event of a physical or virtual attack. For organizations mandated to protect critical Infrastructure, security is at the very heart of the operational mandate. With critical Infrastructure, it is the daily operation of society that is at stake. Just consider the consequences of an extended power loss for a given population.”

Tyson Johnson, Chief Operating Officer, CyberNB

“Large public service companies have been the first targets of physical cybercrime. As such, they play a pioneering role in the development of security measures. The goal of our initiative is to provide manufacturing SMEs with the experience they have gained in infrastructure.”

Jean-Guy Rens, vice president and project manager, CATAAlliance

Cybercrime targets physical goods

Today’s automated plant environment is more agile and more efficient than ever before, but it is also more vulnerable than ever before, due to physical cybercrime. More than 70% of manufacturing companies in Canada are automated and a growing number of these companies are interconnecting their automated equipment with their information systems to extract big data and control production in real time.

Threat on critical infrastructures

Critical infrastructure is in a similar position. As critical systems are being connected to the Internet, small groups of hackers with political, militaristic, or economic goals, have seized the opportunities to pose a serious threat to national critical infrastructure. No longer content to attack just the information systems, they are now targeting industrial and electrical equipment and infrastructure. Cybercrime is changing in nature to become physical.